• Nurse_Robot@lemmy.world
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    8 days ago

    Why the fuck did the school call the cops? Everyone here sucks and failed society at every level. I’m sick of these stories.

    • Cosmonauticus@lemmy.world
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      8 days ago

      Why the fuck did the school call the cops?

      You know why…

      Tamara Taylor and her daughter, identified in pleadings as “N.B.”, sued the City of Honolulu and the Hawaii Department of Education for false arrest, use of excessive force, and racial and disability discrimination after police handcuffed and arrested a 10-year-old Black girl who drew an offensive picture.

      • unexposedhazard@discuss.tchncs.de
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        8 days ago

        But also what is “offensive”? Offensive to pedo christo fascists?

        Edit:

        drew a picture of a figure holding a gun. The picture also included phrases including, “Stand down B—-,” “Yo F—– days are over NOW,” and “Fake to me and DED!”

        Thats not very nice, but also not offensive or illegal. I mean sure a teacher might wanna ask her what made her draw this, but damn bro, calling the cops??

        • Flying Squid@lemmy.world
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          I drew people shooting each other and far worse all the time when I was 10. But then I’m a white male, so I suppose “boys will be boys” in my case, unlike her.

          • Modern_medicine_isnt@lemmy.world
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            8 days ago

            Right, we drew entire armies on the desks with all sorts of phrases coming from the soldiers. Context matters. But I get that a teacher may not want to make that call in this day and age. But they should have a counselor or something on staff to handle this.

      • Nurse_Robot@lemmy.world
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        8 days ago

        Yeah, I do. I suppose it was a rhetorical question. I’m just pissed off and tired of hearing the same thing for decades

  • Catoblepas@lemmy.blahaj.zone
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    8 days ago

    I can’t imagine what kind of fucking freaks would cuff a 10 year old child over a drawing. I hope her lawyer cleans them out.

    Edit:

    Taylor said in filings that officers arrived at the school and interrogated her daughter without her present. Per the complaint, N.B. commented to a school nurse that she “wondered what spending one day in jail would be like.” According to the complaint, officers became upset by the comment and responded by handcuffing and arresting N.B.

    Of course it was over (perceived) contempt of cop and not the drawing. Should have seen it coming.

    • BossDj@lemm.ee
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      8 days ago

      My bias is with education. Given that, please know that we only get one side of the story in this article. If they literally called the police and cuffed a ten year old for drawing a picture on the previous day, this is the most insane story I’ve ever heard.

      But there was likely some shit that went down when she was called into the office that escalated and escalated, because escalating for a NOW solution that fits in a box is all some people know how to do. And then police are called. We’re all too busy, so it’s STOP AND COMPLY OR ELSE because every other solution takes time.

      Keep going back to the roots and you find a bullied ADHD kid who is getting in trouble instead of the kid bullying her all while she was practicing self control strategies. She’s obviously going to escalate. And she was then likely already escalated when police arrived. And shit, we need to stop and figure out why this bully situation even exists.

      More money to education. More people. The end

      • WaxedWookie@lemmy.world
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        8 days ago

        The lawyers will only clean the city out - when the cops fuck around, it’s everyone else that finds out.

  • HootinNHollerin@lemmy.world
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    8 days ago

    When I was like 10-11 a cop choked me and poked me in the eye while I was walking home not saying anything to them. my dumbass brother had wrote cuss words in chalk in the neighbors driveway which I had nothing to do with. My parents refused to help me file a complaint

    • stoly@lemmy.world
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      8 days ago

      Your parents, like mine, were propagandized long before you were born and only knew to give absolute control to authorities. I hope they are better now.

  • PotatoesFall@discuss.tchncs.de
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    8 days ago

    Semi-related: I’ve never understood why american cops insist on handcuffing everybody they arrest. If the person being arrested is not resisting or is otherwise dangerous, why cuff them?

    • myliltoehurts@lemm.ee
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      8 days ago

      It’s such a contrast from Europe. I had the cops called on me once in the UK (and they also don’t have a great reputation) as I drank too much and somehow got stuck in someone’s garden knocking on their window at like 3am to let me out.

      Cops came, ID’d me, asked what I was doing there and helped me climb out/half pulled me out then gave me a ride home. I remember them just having a laugh at me being stupid due to being drunk. I asked them if they could cuff me cuz I wanted to know what it’s like and they said no because they didn’t want me to hurt myself by falling over or something. I also asked if we could go through the McDonald’s drive through when we went by one on the way and offered to bribe them with a happy meal but they just chuckled and told me they can’t do that unfortunately. One of them walked me up to my flat and made sure I got in safe before leaving. Granted I wasn’t arrested or anything, but it felt like a positive experience and I woke up feeling thankful for them having been there the night before.

      To contrast, I’ve once been pulled over in the US with friends and even though the cop didn’t do or say anything wrong, I distinctly remember feeling like his tone and demeanor was challenging (as if he wanted us to argue with him or something). We were let go without a ticket or anything in the end, all he said when we asked why we were pulled over is that it’s a routine check. It felt like a very negative experience and from what it sounds like, it’s as good as it could have gone in the US.

      • captainlezbian@lemmy.world
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        8 days ago

        Wait the American cop knew why he pulled you over? That is exceptionally good. Usually they don’t even know and have the gall to ask you. And they’re just looming with a hand on their gun while they ask

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          8 days ago

          When we pulled over he came over and asked for license and reg, we immediately asked why we got stopped and he said routine check, then proceeded to ask us a bunch of questions about where we are driving from, where to, why etc. I would not answer those now, but we didn’t know about how things go in the US then so we did. He didn’t get anything out of it luckily.

      • roguetrick@lemmy.world
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        I distinctly remember feeling like his tone and demeanor was challenging (as if he wanted us to argue with him or something). We were let go without a ticket or anything in the end, all he said when we asked why we were pulled over is that it’s a routine check.

        That’s an unlawful detention in the US. You can only be pulled over for either actually violating something or a reasonable suspicion of doing a specific illegal thing. They can always make something up, but that’ll limit how long they can investigate you for. Coming out and saying they have no reason should always just be responded with asking to leave.

        • myliltoehurts@lemm.ee
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          8 days ago

          Yeah, I know that now but none of us knew how to handle the situation then. I’ve learned since then to read up on the rights i will have in countries I plan on visiting.

          It’s a shame that we pay our taxes only to have to invest even more energy into protecting ourselves from the system that’s built with our money (I’ve found this to be true to different degrees in most countries unfortunately).

    • FuglyDuck@lemmy.world
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      8 days ago

      Because they could become dangerous and/or decide to resist at any point. And you don’t want to have your partner’s widow asking “why didn’t you cuff them?”

      A 10 yo is a bit different in that they’re far easier to control physically. for most people, they’re not going to be acting entirely rationally and it’s safe for everyone if they’re cuffed. Or it’s supposed to be. I hope Chauvin is enjoying his luxury accommodations,

      • WaxedWookie@lemmy.world
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        8 days ago

        Better to just execute them on the spot - you don’t want them slipping out of the cuffs, then have your partner’s widow asking “why didn’t you just shoot them?”

        People are already searched upon arrest, and I don’t think most people are inclined to try to fistfight a pair of cops armed with batons, tasers and guns from the back of a cop car. It’s not necessary in most of the rest of the world - are the residents of the land of the free so inherently prone to violence that they should be locked up just in case?

        • FuglyDuck@lemmy.world
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          8 days ago

          yes, people here really are that violent. First off, consider that we have cities that have larger populations than many European countries. The US, in terms of population size is closer to the entire EU (350 million to 450, respectively) and it poses some… unique challenges. Secondly look at population adjusted murder rates. Yup. We feature prominently on that list, too.

          It’s. Not appropriate to paint everyone with that brush. But even if it’s only 1% that are violent… that’s still a fairly large amount of violent people to be dealing with, and most of the time, cops are dealing with people suspected of anything ranging from jay walking to mass murder.

          Even in places like the UK, if cops can justify it they will cuff you. And, no, you don’t have to be violent to for them to justify it. (And it’s not terribly difficult for them to do so. Sometimes that can be less of a factual obligation and more paperwork often cover-your-ass sort,

          Generally, it’s best to cuff before the search, the process of cuffing generally places you in a dominant position and better able to respond to aggressive actions. Searching… not so much. (Imagine checking some one’s boot and where your head is when you find that weapon.) M

          • brygphilomena@lemmy.world
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            8 days ago

            If our system didn’t turn every action with police into one that will literally ruin lives even if your innocent, have the potential to be extra judicially murdered, and have to deal with a police force who has no patience and will remarkably quickly escalate to violence themselves maybe the populace wouldn’t resist cops so much

            • GreyEyedGhost@lemmy.ca
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              8 days ago

              And even with this antagonistic system, police officer isn’t in the top 10 professions to die on the job.

            • FuglyDuck@lemmy.world
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              8 days ago

              Probably.

              I’m not saying it’s right. And it’s definitely not preferred. There is a distinct and dire need to reform policing.

              OC asked why, and the Too Angry; Didn’t Read is that cops are scared. They cuff you up when they don’t feel safe. They might also justify it as preventing escape or something. But mostly they’re scared.

              And there is some justification for that not a lot. It’s far less common than they’ll imply. But there is some.

              They’re scared little shits who’ve been selectively hired to be too dumb to find other solutions or have empathy.

        • FuglyDuck@lemmy.world
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          8 days ago

          I’m not? Did you not catch the explicit distinction between 10 yo’s and adults?

  • RandomVideos@programming.dev
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    8 days ago

    Kids can be directly punished if they break a law in the USA?

    In Romania(if i remember correctly), you need to be at least 14 to be punished(if it is proven that the person knew what they were doing was illegal). I assumed it was the same in other countries

  • SuddenDownpour@sh.itjust.works
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    8 days ago

    Do these fuckwits get off on messing with little kids? If things worked properly around there, the feds should investigate those cops’ computer files.